Independent Films by the Numbers

The marketing of Independent Films

Does Film Content Matter for Theatrical Releases?

Odd as it may seem I have begun to wonder if the success of a film in theatrical release is actually driven by its content (beyond a few breakout and unanticipated dogs).  If you plot gross returns against number of screens a movie played on for the top 150 films in the last two years, a funny pattern emerges… the more screens a movie plays the mover money it will make.   

Given that most films open in wide release, this means that for most films success is being decided by the deals created to get them to an audience, rather than the audience’s response to the actual movie. In other words, with few exceptions, the gross revenues of a film in theater release are highly predictable based on the release strategy alone…. promotion and distribution seem to be more important predictors of gross returns than the artistic or content merit of the film.   

In the 2006 movie “Idiocracy,” the future is dominated by low intellects and the top movie is a just shots of peoples asses.  This future is not so unrealistic, since if you were able to place that movie on at least 4,000 screens nationwide with suitable promotion it could very easily be the top film today.  

In the documentary community, there is much talk about how the theatre business does not give docs a chance, so it is hard to find these films in theater release.   What this discussion misses is a realization of how broke the system is today.  Craft is not driving the theater system today, so theaters are saturated with one after another pieces of Hollywood slock.    We see a similar pattern on TV where the number of stations have increased, but there seems to be fewer quality shows to choose from.  What we need to do is think about how to fix this.

Comments are off for this post

Tips on how to plan a film festival run

The film festival circuit can be overwhelming to the novice filmmaker.  Without good guidance, it is difficult to plan a festival run for your film.  This post will give some solid advice on how to start the planning and make your way through the festival circuit.   

  1. Regardless of the film, you will be rejected by some film festivals. Rejection is not necessarily a reflection on the quality of your film, since the art of festival programming involves a balance between finding the most compelling individual pieces and fitting them into a program of other films. Also, personal tastes of the programmers can make or break your application; which is out of your control and very hard to predict. My advice is to not let the rejections get to you. It is part of the process.
  2. It is important to set goals for your run. It is hard to plan anything if you do not know what you want.  For instance, if you want a distribution deal, you should focus your festival run on festivals where the buyers are.  The clearer you can be about your goals the better your chances are at succeeding in obtaining these goals.
  3. The sequencing of your festivals run is important for two reasons — playing at some festivals will lessen your chance at playing other festivals, while some festivals act as recruiting grounds for other festivals.  If we take a look at the films that played at Sundance in 2008 that also played at other festivals (http://www.lathrios.com/coschedule.php?festid=14&year=2008), the clear pattern is that few feature films shown at Sundance come from other festivals, while this festival is used by other festivals to find films for festivals.  Shorts are more able to play elsewhere and then Sundance.   Get to know the sequencing of festivals.  Most filmmakers desire to premiere at one of the top-tier festivals (Sundance, Tribeca, Toronto, Berlin, etc…), which is solid strategy; however it can be difficult since these leading festivals are very competitive.  For those unable to land a slot at a premiere festival, it is possible to have a very successful run by premiering at another festivals and using that festivals to ladder to other festivals.
  4. It is useful to see how other similar films to yours are working or have worked the festival circuit.  This is useful as a means to understand and then replicate successful strategies of other films, and as a means to understand how to position your film.  Positioning should involve some thought on how to differentiate your film from competitive films, since festivals tend to want to attract films that stand apart from previous films they have shown.  
  5. It is important to research what kind of films a festival shows… topics, genre, and formats.  As any reader of this blog knows, runtimes are important for determining success getting into festivals.  If you have non-standard runtime, it is useful to see a given festival you want to apply to programs films of that length.
Comments are off for this post

New Functionality for Festival Database – Similarity Measures

So I just added a new analysis feature to the festival information pages – Similarity Measures. This allow you to at a glance understand how strongly or not a given festival is another using their shared films. Similarity is shown in two ways — by percentages and a log-likelihood score. The percentages are straight forward… they are a measure of the frequency of overlap as compared to the total number of films shown in the other festival. This measure is good, but is prone to distortion based on differing sizes of festivals. An overlap of 5 films with a small festival maybe significant, but the same overlap with a larger festival may not be. By random chance alone, you should expect larger festivals to have more overlap with any other festival, since they have more slots to potentially showcase overlapping films. Likewise, a larger festival should have a greater chance of sharing films with other festivals than a smaller festival occurring at the same time. Log-Likelihood solves this problem by calculating a statistical measure of similarity using a Chi-Squared distribution. This allows the significance of any similarity to be quantified and we can more readily understand what is a meaningful difference and what is not. Tomorrow, I will flesh out the use of this new tool. In the meantime, you should give it a good and tell me what you think.

Comments are off for this post

Added new data and festivals

I have added the data for the Ourense (in Spain), True/False, Full Frame, and Palm Springs (not the short fest), as well as having a full 5 years of Berlin data.

These data show the emergence of True/False as a top documentary film festival. It has strongly captured the post-Sundance position with a strong set of films, despite having a limited roster of films. I have heard great things about the programmers at True/False and their lineup/positioning shows it.

Comments are off for this post

The Language DNA of Film Titles

As I sit here in Southern California awaiting the Academy Awards this weekend,  a model I have been working on to better understand the language of film titles is complete. I was able to do a bunch of work on the airplane out here from New York.  The model was built using Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) to understand what film title words are associated with winning festival awards.  LSI is a natural language processing technique that is good for understanding hidden patterns in collections of text.  Here is a general description of the process I wrote for a marketingprofs.com article a few years ago… 

LSI maps the contextual relationships between words in terms of common usage patterns across a collection of documents called a repository. For instance, in documents about dogs (the animal), one would expect that word “dog” would be accompanied by contextually relevant words such as “collar”, “wagging”, “puppy”, or “leash.” These associations are less likely in comparable documents discussing “reptiles.” When a large number of documents are put together as repository, a statistical measure of these connections can be generated via LSI.     

LSI enables an analyst to understand how words relate to one another through the creation of a similarity measure, which reveals whether a given language pattern is similarly used compared with another pattern.

The math is brutal, but the result are always interesting.  The top 50 title words (a natural breaking point) that are associated with award winning festival are:

  1. war
  2. country
  3. love
  4. mother
  5. happy
  6. son
  7. blue
  8. broken
  9. now
  10. princess
  11. everything
  12. body
  13. day
  14. black
  15. story
  16. up
  17. park
  18. pool
  19. wild
  20. daily
  21. cant
  22. la
  23. run
  24. high
  25. innocent
  26. requiem
  27. august
  28. night
  29. amour
  30. crazy
  31. four
  32. hope
  33. dark
  34. daughter
  35. trouble
  36. bell
  37. color
  38. full
  39. dance
  40. it
  41. dust
  42. want
  43. super
  44. eye
  45. sex
  46. hotel
  47. go
  48. legacy
  49. she
  50. river
Comments are off for this post

Oscar Films in Festivals 2007 (Documentary Nominations)

My analysis of documentary festivals that played Oscar Nominees in 2007/early 2008 is somewhat problematic by the absence of Full Frame and Hot Docs. These critical festivals for docs would certainly play a strong rule in staging leading doc films for an Oscar nomination.  The database still has valuable insights for docs despite these absences.

 

Despite claims to the contrary by some online, the selection of films for the doc nomination lists for the most part has a strong pedigree of successfully showing on the Festival circuit in 2007.  Sundance and Silverdocs play a strong rule in the festival life for both shorts and feature docs.  The play of longer short docs at Sundance (Freeheld and La Corona) in 2007/2008 shows a programming shift at Sundance to embrace the odd length of documentary favored by the Oscar short doc category (35-40 min films do best in this category).  Sicko’s festival release is an exception and seems more like a narrative film nominated for an Oscar, but what do you expect from a celebrity doc maker like Moore.  

 

Some other festivals of interest are Cucalorus and Palm Springs Short Film Festival.  Cucalorous has a good track record this year of programming Oscar nominated films, while Palm Spring Short’s breath of short films is good at capturing short nomination docs (including their awards where Freeheld took top doc prize and Salim Baba took second).

 

Best documentary feature

 

“No End in Sight” by Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs

• SilverDocs (2007)

• Sundance Film Festival (2007)

 

“Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience” by Richard E. Robbins

• Florida Film Festival (2007)

 

“Sicko” by Michael Moore and Meghan O’Hara

• Cannes Film Festival (2007)

• London Film Festival (2007)

 

“Taxi to the Dark Side” by Alex Gibney and Eva Orner

• Chicago International Film Festival  (2007)

• Cucalorus (2007)

• Hamptons International Film Festival (2007)

• Newport International Film Festival (2007)

• SilverDocs (2007)

• Tribeca Film Festival (2007)

• Vancouver International Film Festival (2007)

 

“War/Dance” by Andrea Nix Fine and Sean Fine

• Ashland Independent Film Festival (2007)

• Cucalorus (2007)

• Los Angeles Film Festival (2007)

• Maryland Film Festival (2007)

• Newport International Film Festival (2007)

• Sarasota Film Festival (2007)

• Seattle International Film Festival (2007)

• SilverDocs (2007)

• Sundance Film Festival (2007)

• Tokyo International Film Festival (2007)

• Vancouver International Film Festival (2007)

• Woodstock Film Festival (2007)

 

Best documentary short subject

 

“Freeheld” by Cynthia Wade and Vanessa Roth

• Boston Independent Film Festival (2007)

• Cucalorus (2007)

• Outfest Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Film Festival (2007)

• Palm Springs International Short Film Festival (2007)

 

• Seattle International Film Festival (2007)

• SilverDocs (2007)

• Sundance Film Festival (2007)

• Woodstock Film Festival (2007)

 

“La Corona (The Crown)” by Amanda Micheli and Isabel Vega

• Sundance Film Festival (2008)

 

“Salim Baba” by Tim Sternberg and Francisco Bello

•  Mill Valley Film Festival (2007)

•  Palm Springs International Short Film Festival (2007)

•  Telluride Film Festival (2007)

•  Tribeca Film Festival (2007)

•  Woodstock Film Festival (2007)

•  Sundance Film Festival (2008)

 

“Sari’s Mother” by James Longley

• San Francisco International Film Festival (2007)

• SilverDocs (2007)


1 comment

Oscar Films in Festivals 2007 (Actor Nominations)

I have broken down the acting awards for the Oscars by the ones that have played in festivals I tracked in 2007. Clearly, Toronto is a great festival to set up for an Oscar nomination — a large number of films show at this critical festival.  The other festivals of note are Chicago and London.  I was surprised by the absence Tribeca, which tends to compete with Toronto over star talent premieres.  Berlin and Cannes play important role on the International film world, but the domestic focus of the actor categories prevents these festivals from expressing themselves fully in my list below.  Mill Valley and Telluride tends to program many of the nominated films in the acting categories, but these festival seem to get their content in the shadow of screenings at the larger Chicago and Toronto festivals.

 

—————————– 

Performance by an actor in a leading role 

 

George Clooney in “Michael Clayton”

• Chicago International Film Festival (2007)

• Mill Valley Film Festival (2007)

 

Tommy Lee Jones in “In the Valley of Elah 

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007) 

 

Viggo Mortensen in “Eastern Promises”

• London Film Festival (2007)

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

 

—————————– 

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

 

Casey Affleck in “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford”

• London Film Festival (2007)

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

 

Javier Bardem in “No Country for Old Men”

• Cannes Film Festival (2007) 

• New York Film Festival (2007) 

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

 

Hal Holbrook in “Into the Wild” 

• London Film Festival (2007) 

• Telluride Film Festival (2007)

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

 

Tom Wilkinson in “Michael Clayton”

• Chicago International Film Festival (2007)

• Mill Valley Film Festival (2007)

 

—————————–  

Performance by an actress in a leading role 

 

Cate Blanchett in “Elizabeth: The Golden Age”

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

 

Julie Christie in “Away from Her”

• Berlin International Film Festival (2007) 

• Boston Independent Film Festival (2007) 

• Florida Film Festival (2007) 

• Santa Barbara International Film Festival (2007)

• Sarasota Film Festival (2007)

• Sundance Film Festival (2007)

 

Marion Cotillard in “La Vie en Rose” 

• San Francisco International Film Festival (2007) 

• Seattle International Film Festival (2007)

 

Laura Linney in “The Savages” 

• Chicago International Film Festival (2007) 

• Hamptons International Film Festival (2007) 

• London Film Festival (2007) 

• Mill Valley Film Festival (2007) 

• Sundance Film Festival (2007)

• Telluride Film Festival (2007) 

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

• Vancouver International Film Festival (2007)

 

Ellen Page in “Juno” 

• London Film Festival (2007) 

• Telluride Film Festival (2007)

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

 

—————————–  

Performance by an actress in a supporting role  

 

Cate Blanchett in “I’m Not There” 

• London Film Festival (2007) 

• Mill Valley Film Festival (2007) 

• New York Film Festival (2007)

• Telluride Film Festival (2007) 

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007) 

• Woodstock Film Festival (2007)

 

Saoirse Ronan in “Atonement” 

• Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

• Vancouver International Film Festival (2007)

 

Amy Ryan in “Gone Baby Gone”

• Chicago International Film Festival (2007) 

• Mill Valley Film Festival (2007)

 

Tilda Swinton in “Michael Clayton” 

• Chicago International Film Festival (2007)

• Mill Valley Film Festival (2007)

Comments are off for this post

33 Festivals are in the Database

I have just loaded in the 33 Festival into the Lathrios film festival database, which have shown just shy of 4,500 films.  I am off to Sundance this weekend, but will be back next week.  Until then, here is a list of the available festivals with data…  Ashland Independent Film Festival (2007)

Berlin International Film Festival (2007)

Boston Film Festival (2007)

Boston Independent Film Festival (2007)

Brooklyn International Film Festival (2007)

Cannes Film Festival (2007)

Chicago International Film Festival (2007)

Cucalorus (2007)

Florida Film Festival (2007)

Hamptons International Film Festival (2007)

London Film Festival (2007)

Los Angeles Film Festival (2007)

Maryland Film Festival (2007)

Mill Valley Film Festival (2007)

New York Film Festival (2007)

Newport International Film Festival (2007)

Outfest Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Film Festival (2007)

Palm Springs International Short Film Festival (2007)

San Francisco International Film Festival (2007)

Santa Barbara International Film Festival (2007)

Sarasota Film Festival (2007)

Seattle International Film Festival (2007)

Silver Lake Film Festival (2007)

SilverDocs (2007)

Slamdance Film Festival (2008 | 2007)

South by Southwest Film Festival (2007)

Sundance Film Festival (2008 | 2007)

Telluride Film Festival (2007)

Tokyo International Film Festival (2007)

Toronto International Film Festival (2007)

Tribeca Film Festival (2007)

Vancouver International Film Festival (2007)

Woodstock Film Festival (2007) 

Comments are off for this post

Top Award Winning Festival Films

 A list of festival films winning more than 2 awards in the Lathrios database….  [Disclaimer:  This is based on 30 major film festivals within the Lathrios database ]

  1. Freeheld (2007) – 38min | 6 awards
  2. Everything Will Be OK (2006) – 17min | 5 awards
  3. Pariah (2006) – 28min | 5 awards
  4. War/Dance (2006) – 105min | 5 awards
  5. The Tube with a Hat (2006) – 23min | 4 awards
  6. PERSEPOLIS (2007) – 95min | 3 awards
  7. Pop Foul (2006) – 20min | 3 awards
  8. Taxi to the Dark Side (2007) – 105min | 3 awards
  9. The King of Kong (2006) – 79min | 3 awards
  10. 27,000 Days (2007) – 10min | 2 awards
  11. A Son’s Sacrifice (2006) – 27min | 2 awards
  12. Arranged (2007) – 91min | 2 awards
  13. Audience of One (2007) – 88min | 2 awards
  14. August Evening (2007) – 135min | 2 awards
  15. Autism: The Musical (2007) – 94min | 2 awards
  16. Billy the Kid (2007) – 85min | 2 awards
  17. Black Irish (2006) – 92min | 2 awards
  18. Body of War (2007) – 87min | 2 awards
  19. California Dreamin’ (Endless) (2007) – 155min | 2 awards
  20. Clear Cut, Simple (2006) – 14min | 2 awards
  21. Contact (2007) – 10min | 2 awards
  22. Control (2007) – 121min | 2 awards
  23. Darius Goes West: The Roll of His Life (2006) – 85min | 2 awards
  24. Death to the Tinman (2006) – 12min | 2 awards
  25. Enemies of Happiness (2006) – 58min | 2 awards
  26. For the Bible Tells Me So (2007) – 100min | 2 awards
  27. In The Shadow of the Moon (2006) – 100min | 2 awards
  28. Manda Bala: Send a Bullet (2006) – 85min | 2 awards
  29. Red Without Blue (2006) – 77min | 2 awards
  30. Run Granny Run (2007) – 77min | 2 awards
  31. Salim Baba (2007) – 15min | 2 awards
  32. She’s a Boy I Knew (2007) – 70min | 2 awards
  33. Shotgun Stories (2007) – 90min | 2 awards
  34. Silent Light (2007) – 127min | 2 awards
  35. Souvenirs (2006) – 9min | 2 awards
  36. The Death of Michael Smith (2006) – 88min | 2 awards
  37. The Devil Came on Horseback (2007) – 85min | 2 awards
  38. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) – 112min | 2 awards
  39. The Ladies (2007) – 13min | 2 awards
  40. The Needful Head (2007) – 5min | 2 awards
  41. The Price of Sugar (2007) – 90min | 2 awards
  42. Tuya’s Marriage (2005) – 96min | 2 awards
  43. Unsettled (2006) – 80min | 2 awards
  44. We Are Together (2006) – 86min | 2 awards

 [ Disclaimer: Yes, I am the producer of Freeheld, so it probably has some home field advantage.  That being said, the film run has been impressive with 6 additional awards unreflected in my database of 30 festivals, so it deserves to be up near the top! ] 

3 comments

Top 100 Festival Films of 2007

 As measured by number of festivals screening each Film 

  1. Everything Will Be OK (2006) – 17min | 12 festivals
  2. I Just Wanted To Be Somebody (2006) – 10min | 11 festivals
  3. The Great World of Sound (2006) – 106min | 11 festivals
  4. War/Dance (2006) – 105min | 10 festivals
  5. Eagle VS Shark (2007) – 87min | 9 festivals
  6. God Provides (2007) – 9min | 9 festivals
  7. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) – 112min | 9 festivals
  8. The Unforeseen (2007) – 88min | 9 festivals
  9. Fay Grim (2006) – 118min | 8 festivals
  10. Happiness (2006) – 11min | 8 festivals
  11. In The Shadow of the Moon (2006) – 100min | 8 festivals
  12. Pop Foul (2006) – 20min | 8 festivals
  13. The King of Kong (2006) – 79min | 8 festivals
  14. The Savages (2007) – 113min | 8 festivals
  15. The Tube with a Hat (2006) – 23min | 8 festivals
  16. 4 months, 3 weeks and 2 days (2007) – 113min | 7 festivals
  17. A Walk into the Sea: Danny Williams and the Warhol Factory (2007) – 75min | 7 festivals
  18. Black White + Gray: A Portrait of Sam Wagstaff and Robert Mapplethorpe(2007) – 77min | 7 festivals
  19. Freeheld (2007) – 38min | 7 festivals
  20. How To Cook Your Life (2006) – 100min | 7 festivals
  21. I Want To Be A Pilot (2006) – 11min | 7 festivals
  22. Rocket Science (2007) – 98min | 7 festivals
  23. Shotgun Stories (2007) – 90min | 7 festivals
  24. The Devil Came on Horseback (2007) – 85min | 7 festivals
  25. The Fighting Cholitas (2006) – 20min | 7 festivals
  26. The Saddest Boy in the World () – 13min | 7 festivals
  27. Airplanes (2006) – 10min | 6 festivals
  28. Away From Her (2006) – 110min | 6 festivals
  29. Black Sheep (2006) – 87min | 6 festivals
  30. Broken English (2006) – 96min | 6 festivals
  31. By Modern Measure (2006) – 5min | 6 festivals
  32. Chicago 10 () – 104min | 6 festivals
  33. Crazy Love (2006) – 91min | 6 festivals
  34. Dear Lemon Lima (2006) – 11min | 6 festivals
  35. Family Reunion (2006) – 19min | 6 festivals
  36. Fido (2006) – 91min | 6 festivals
  37. Grace is Gone (2006) – 90min | 6 festivals
  38. Iska’s Journey (2007) – 93min | 6 festivals
  39. Jellyfish (2007) – 78min | 6 festivals
  40. Lake of Fire (2007) – 152min | 6 festivals
  41. Madame Tutli-Putli (2007) – 18min | 6 festivals
  42. Protagonist (2006) – 90min | 6 festivals
  43. Salim Baba (2007) – 15min | 6 festivals
  44. Scott Walker – 30 Century Man (2006) – 95min | 6 festivals
  45. Strange Culture (2006) – 75min | 6 festivals
  46. Taxi to the Dark Side (2007) – 105min | 6 festivals
  47. Terror’s Advocate (2007) – 135min | 6 festivals
  48. The Back of Her Head (2007) – 20min | 6 festivals
  49. We Are Together (2006) – 86min | 6 festivals
  50. Zoo (2006) – 80min | 6 festivals
  51. 4 Elements (2006) – 90min | 5 festivals
  52. American Fork (2007) – 94min | 5 festivals
  53. Audience of One (2007) – 88min | 5 festivals
  54. Caramel (2007) – 95min | 5 festivals
  55. Checkpoint () – 12min | 5 festivals
  56. Chinese Dumplings (2006) – 8min | 5 festivals
  57. Dante’s Inferno (2007) – 77min | 5 festivals
  58. Doubletime (2007) – 82min | 5 festivals
  59. Dreams and Desires-Family Ties (2006) – 10min | 5 festivals
  60. Everything’s Cool (2006) – 100min | 5 festivals
  61. Exiled (2006) – 113min | 5 festivals
  62. Hannah Takes the Stairs (2007) – 84min | 5 festivals
  63. I’m Not There (2006) – 135min | 5 festivals
  64. Interview (2007) – 81min | 5 festivals
  65. Joe Strummer: the Future is Unwritten (2006) – 123min | 5 festivals
  66. Kurt Cobain About A Son (2006) – 96min | 5 festivals
  67. Lady Chatterley (2006) – 168min | 5 festivals
  68. Lola (2006) – 12min | 5 festivals
  69. Manufactured Landscapes (2006) – 90min | 5 festivals
  70. Mukhsin (2006) – 94min | 5 festivals
  71. My Brother Is An Only Child (2006) – 108min | 5 festivals
  72. Nanking (2007) – 91min | 5 festivals
  73. Nomads TX (2006) – 86min | 5 festivals
  74. Off The Grid: Life On The Mesa (2006) – 64min | 5 festivals
  75. One Hundred Nails (2007) – 92min | 5 festivals
  76. One Rat Short (2006) – 10min | 5 festivals
  77. Paprika (2006) – 90min | 5 festivals
  78. PERSEPOLIS (2007) – 95min | 5 festivals
  79. Quincy & Althea (2006) – 10min | 5 festivals
  80. Rails & Ties (2007) – 96min | 5 festivals
  81. Red Without Blue (2006) – 77min | 5 festivals
  82. Salt Kiss (2006) – 18min | 5 festivals
  83. SECRET SUNSHINE (2007) – 142min | 5 festivals
  84. Shuteye Hotel (2007) – 7min | 5 festivals
  85. Silver Jew (2007) – 51min | 5 festivals
  86. Son of Rambow (2007) – 95min | 5 festivals
  87. Super Amigos (2007) – 82min | 5 festivals
  88. The Band’s Visit (2007) – 89min | 5 festivals
  89. The Flight Of The Red Ballon (2007) – 113min | 5 festivals
  90. The Job (2007) – 4min | 5 festivals
  91. The Last Mistress () – 114min | 5 festivals
  92. The Price of Sugar (2007) – 90min | 5 festivals
  93. The Signal (2006) – 99min | 5 festivals
  94. The Ten (2007) – 94min | 5 festivals
  95. The Walker (2006) – 107min | 5 festivals
  96. Tuya’s Marriage (2005) – 96min | 5 festivals
  97. Yella (2007) – 89min | 5 festivals
  98. You, the Living (2007) – 94min | 5 festivals
  99. Yours Truly (2006) – 7min | 5 festivals
  100. 2 Days in Paris (2007) – 96min | 4 festivals

Comments are off for this post

« Previous PageNext Page »